23. Why Are My Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Worse at Night When I’m Trying to Sleep?

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Many physicians believe it is more about the brain’s perception of the symptoms rather than an actual increase in intensity.

In general, during the day the brain is busy with managing all of the input it gets from the body.  It is occupied with thinking and making decisions, directing the movement of the body, interpreting input from the eyes and ears, etc.  The brain has to prioritized what signals to react to and, as such, it doesn’t concentrate on the background noise it senses from the neuropathy.  At night, however, when quietly resting in bed with the lights out, there are many fewer signals coming into the brain. The brain notices the signals coming from the neuropathy and the neuropathy is perceived to be worse.

Additionally, depending on how much arthritis is in the low back, when some people lay flat the nerves from the spine that travel to the feet and legs may become compressed. This may cause an increase the intensity of the symptoms.

Questions and Answers About Peripheral Neuropathy ​

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THIS SITE IS WRITTEN BY A PHYSICIAN WHO SPECIALIZES IN THE TREATMENT OF PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY.

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