7. I Have Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy…What Does That Mean?

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Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy in the US. Research has shown that 50% of diabetics will develop peripheral neuropathy over the course of their disease. Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent and generally the first complication associated with diabetes.

Generally, the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy are numbness, burning, tingling and/or shooting pains in the feet and legs. Symptoms start in the toes and, over time, often intensify and go up the feet, into the ankles and then into the lower legs. Sometimes the hands are affected. Commonly, both sides of the body are affected in a symmetrical manner.

There are limited options that are available to delay the progression of diabetic neuropathy. Making better choices with respect to exercise and diet are very important.

Research has shown that diabetics are very often vitamin B1 deficient, also known as LowB1. Vitamin B1 deficiency is thought to contribute to the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and, in my experience, restoring vitamin B1 levels in diabetics is often the most important and effective tool available to help diminish the intensity of symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Many physicians recommend restoring vitamin B1 levels with a high-potency bioactive form of the vitamin.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW A HIGH-POTENCY BIOACTIVE FORM OF VITAMIN B1 MAY HELP.

Vitamin B12 deficiency may also contribute to the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and many physicians recommend the use oral or injectable forms of vitamin B12 for their patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Other nutrients such as alpha lipoic acid, evening primrose oil, borage oil, vitamin D, and vitamin E are sometimes helpful as well.

Many physicians prescribe gabapentin for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Although gabapentin may be very helpful in controlling painful symptoms, many physicians question if it is at all useful in patients whose only significant symptom is numbness.

It is important for diabetics to be under the care of a physician and to keep their blood sugars under control. People with diabetes should always consult a physician, counselor or dietician on ways to make better choices on what to eat and how to exercise.  Making these lifestyle changes is vitally important and may help to delay the progression of peripheral neuropathy and other complications associated with diabetes. 

Questions and Answers About Peripheral Neuropathy ​

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DISCLAIMER

THIS SITE IS WRITTEN BY A PHYSICIAN WHO SPECIALIZES IN THE TREATMENT OF PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY.

THE CONTENT OF THIS SITE IS INTENDED TO BE A RESOURCE FOR PEOPLE SUFFERING FROM PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY.

THE VIEWS EXPRESSED HERE ARE THE OPINIONS OF THE
AUTHOR AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO ESTABLISH A
DOCTOR/PATIENT RELATIONSHIP.

CONSULT WITH YOUR PHYSICIAN ON ALL HEALTHCARE MATTERS

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